Slick Bellies

SLICK BELLIES

SUCH TENDER TOUCH GIVEN TO NEW
OLD IS SUNK IN SEA
SALT WASHING SHORE, FLAVOR
THOUGHTFUL MEALS
WASN’T LONG AGO THIS TANG WAS GATHERED
BY FLAKY HANDS
COASTAL BREEZE
A STING SO WELCOME IT BENDS LIPS UPWARDS
TEETH CAPPED
READY FOR FISH AND COCONUT RICE
EVERY STEP
A CHANCE TO WALK FORWARD
MOVEMENT TOWARDS CHANCE
SHELLS OF UNCERTAINTY SCRAPING BALD FEET
SAND DOLLAR COFFINS, A DELIGHT TO SPEND
TO BE BURNT WILLINGLY
HEAR A CHOIR OF SLICK BELLIES
HEAR YOUR NUMB SURPRISE
HEALTH FOR LILACS
TEARS ARE BUT WATER

WINDS BLOW MEDITATIVE

NORTHEAST WINDS BLOW MEDITATIVE SONGS
ACROSS LONG OLD BRANCHES
RESTING WOODEN BONES
UPON A CREAM HOUSE WITH FOREST-GREEN SHUDDERS A HOME COMPOSED OF MANY ROOMS AND MASKS
ONE OF FLEETING TIME
A VIBRANT FAMILY’S INEVITABLE CHANGE
ANCIENT TIMBERS FALL
FANTASTIC REDS AND YELLOWS FALL

BORN INTO A COUNTRY OF FIRE
WITH A BLADE FLUSH AGAINST ACHILLES HEEL
BREEZE MUSIC WITHOUT FEAR
HOLD TIRED MINDS IN SENSUOUS CHAOS
CARRY MY LONESOMENESS TOWARDS THE RECESSED BROOK
I’VE NOTHING TO SPARE, BUT TRANSLATION
OF NATURE SO MAGNIFICENT
I WILL FAIL TOO GRASP HER ROUTINE BEAUTY
STRUGGLE AND SUFFOCATE AMONGST HER HEALING
TAKE FOR GRANTED LANDSCAPE, I TRAMPLE BLINDLY
AS SHE CALMLY IMPOSES A LISTEN…
WOOSH – HAAAH – WOOSH – RAAH
“EXIST IN LOVE” HER DIVINE ADMISSION

Coyote cries at dawn — a premiere and review

Coyote cries at dawn  — a premiere and review of Cate Von Csoke’s ‘Almoon’

BY RYAN DRAG1 WEEK AGOIN ALBUM REVIEW · MUSIC

{Disclaimer: the following article was written before protests broke-out across America. The writer would like to exclaim his complete support concerning the Black Lives Matter movement and the defunding of abusive police institutions.}

Photos by Nicole & Jenna


Simplicity. Sounds simple, right? Well, a lot of people get it wrong or simply… add too much. Almoon by Brooklyn based via Australia, musician Cate Von Csoke, is minimalism done tastefully and without driving a motive to its death. Hey, don’t get me wrong. I love a one or two note repetition for days, but this is more than that. Cate’s music retains old-school chord motives dosed with the Velvet’s drum pattern and some Vox repeat-percussion guitar layered in for good measure, and of course Cate’s smokey vocals, which dust the songs as dried, blown, dandelions scattering that rolling field you’ve always wanted to walk through.

Hold on… That drum sound is more than familiar… Is that…Steve Shelley of Sonic Youth banging on those skins? You bet. In fact Almoon was recorded in Sonic Youth’s studio in New Jersey by Ted Young, and produced by another artist you may be familiar with, Vacant Lots’ Jared Artaud. I’m assuming that’s him turning up the repeat tremolo, but it wasn’t in the press release. (Good gods, this man keeps appearing in my reviews! I suppose this exposes how busy the fellow is).

Anyway I digress, because this LP is very much Von Csoke’s own. The songs are only slightly colored with tambo and percussion.  At the center of this moon is a vintage electric guitar strum and ethereal vocals, having all been composed and performed by Von Csoke herself. The music (at first) recalled this wild duo from Austin called, Headdress (once on the Mexican Summer label.) Years ago I witnessed them at the original, crumbling, Market Hotel. That band (according to their album sleeves) recorded in caves located in a desert somewhere; Cate wrote the bulk of her songs during a stint in the Mojave, mystical, spot-on, no?

There’s also a dash of Mazzy Star and Tess Parks (Anton Newcombe’s protégé.) Which brings me to my only critique: I could have used a bit more of Cate’s natural voice. I’m a fan of reverb abound, but the effect oftentimes interferes with hearing the words or a singer’s nuances. This is more a testament to the songwriter’s voice and it is a bit inconsequential, considering I’ve heard Cate live and loved her sound (got me to buy a few more drinks.) This is what she wants to sound like, so really, I have no issues. Regardless, the verb works and fits so who really cares? Cate Von Csoke sounds great and the atmosphere definitely puts a listener into a zone. Almoon is a record that should be listened to from start to finish. Don’t bother with finding a single, just let it play-out. I’m lying in a backyard in upstate (away from Virus City, hoping for justice) with headphones safety on amongst wildflowers and I’m happy as Hell! I only wish I had the vinyl. “Please Cate, don’t forget to send me a copy on June 11th!” That’s the release date folks. Dig…

Eight tunes dancing around your isolation – bhumra boom bra crang ga ga ga -now enters soft melodies for a reflective ride across that “Silver Highway” cooling slightly the back of your neck. As the road blurs into smoke clouds, a mirage appears in forgotten heat. You pause… remembering some happiness stored in a pocket. Recalling to yourself: “I’ve been walking on dandelions. All I wanna do is dream around.”

Me too, Cate. Me too. Almoon is a fine album. Put it on, sit back, and drift away. It’ll be good for you, whilst resting next to those coyotes in the sky.

Confusion (or Docile Limb)

CONFUSION (OR DOCILE LIMB)

BATTLING WONDERMENT WITH AGED BRASS HORNS
WHOSE RUSTY SONGS ARE NO LONGER FUNNY
AS CAREFULLY CRIPPLING PASSIONS ARE
HIDDEN IN A LABYRINTH OF GREEN TERROR
SLOWLY DRAINING TO RED AND BROWN FAULTS
NOT A PLACE TO PAUSE GRACEFULLY

SHADOWS OF YOUTH’S SADNESS ARE
LIGHT SWITCHES TO ELDER RESTING CHAIRS
CONFUSIONS CAST WILL HEAL BONES FOR
WALKING COLD STREETS CONSTITUTED IN MADNESS
AFTER SEWING SEEDS OF ISOLATION WITHIN
SULLENLY PALE BOXES

ONCE A DAY GIVES ANOTHER
SOLITUDE FORGES RESERVOIR WATER

COVID-19: HIT OF AMERICAN WEST

PAUSE FOR HUMAN NATURE       ALL SICK ALL YEARS

THOSE BLANKETS TO DA INGINES    KILLED EM

MY FRIEND       ABSOLVED IN HIS BUNKER

CURATED FOR YEARS      NO GUNS (I TRUST?)

SOME CANNED GOODS AND MUSICAL EQUIPMENT

HOPEFULLY    SOME GOOD DOPE FROM DAN     MADE

IT IN… I’M ON A ROOF       FINANCIALLY UNSTABLE

LEATHER BOOTS   READY FOR WALKING HOME

(WHICH DOESN’T REALLY EXIST FOR ANYONE)    HOWEVER

I’LL MAKE HER SMILE FOR DAYS         SUN SHINE IS

FREE        WE’RE ABOVE GRASS       NOT ABOVE EATIN  IT

PAUSE FOR HUMAN GATHERINGS

 

SOME DANCE AROUND FIRE

SOME SIT DIRE

SOME GAZE INTO SPACE

I GLAZE OVER, HEAD BACK, EYES, EARS,

COCK, BALLS, HARD-UP FOR CHANGE IN

TEMPERATURE           HAND-IN-HAND WITH

EASE         ONLY BECAUSE

DEATH IS CERTAIN, BUT LIFE

MUST BE TAKEN

Alt Citizen Review

“Rescue” us: The Vacant Lots latest single

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“I need a rescue,” sing/speaks Jared Artaud of the electronic-psych band The Vacant Lots and don’t we all at this point. Their latest single: Rescue, is out April 24th and is an appropriate release for these tumultuous times. The Vacant Lots are a musical duo which seems to have been under quarantine for almost a decade already, and this current single evokes such. Portrayed musically is a feeling of condensed isolation (with a catchy beat of course.) It is the first track to reach mass consumption from their upcoming full-length (via Fuzz Club Records) Interzone, which will hit the market on June 26th 2020. “Interzone, you say?” whispers goat-foot boy whose room stacked with William Burroughs paper-back novels creeps inside your weary brain-folds. Yes. Interzone. The band is aware. Their press release even addresses such. Anyway…

This new track finds the band in familiar territory. If you are already interested in The Vacant Lots’ sound you will dig this song, if you aren’t up-to-speed, well, it is a quality, modern single, comprised of a pummeling beat, synth-phonic bass and delightful electronic swooshes having cocktails with fuzz guitar and laid-back vox. Jared and Brian have consistently produced material that has “heart” and if Rescue is a glimpse into the future LP, the duo is not giving up this vibe.
If further description of the current sound is what you require, this new track (though less abrasive) has definite similarities to another duo, New York’s classic: Suicide. In fact, singer Jared has been working on resurrecting a lot of Vega’s solo works in the past couple of years and even used Alan’s very own Arp synthesizer on the Lots record. Keyboardist and percussionist, Brian recalls:

“Jared and I bounced ideas back and forth while working in seclusion on opposite coasts. We would
just send files to each other until the songs were arranged. Then we met up at the studio in Brooklyn
where we were fortunate enough to borrow Alan Vega’s Arp synth and finished recording with
engineer Ted Young. We then worked with Maurizio Baggio to mix it.”
Ah, as we all wake for another moon cycle and search across streams of unlocked windows while news of illness and revival plant seeds of a new dawn shaking in backyard ponds filled with short-lived goldfish, the best we can do is stay inside and listen to music, send praise to the healthcare workers, and to humanities determination to survive and create. Check out Rescue, why not? From there, listen to some more new tracks then let your mind travel to a mysterious place of vivid imagination you forgot existed before this pause.

Alt Citizen Feature

Psychically Ill: A tribute of words for Tres Warren

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Clouds of fuzz He sits on. Thump of kick drum, drone of analog keys, give way to the gospel choir, and a river of wah guitars of simplistic pleasure — pass the tea of another time, please — find a road filled with shadows — don’t turn away, four pencil drawn skulls are laughing for unknown dimensions, shining brightly.

Psychic Ills are a band whose repertoire doesn’t include a song that isn’t “cool” (though many of their tunes transcend past this overused, yet elusive description of rock music). Because of this fact, Tres Warren and the Ills intrigued me from the “get-go” when I arrived to lay roots in NYC. I recall hearing Elizabeth Hart’s warm bass sliding amidst synthscapes and swirling head-pans of Tres, and saying to myself: “This is the music I wanted to find in this city.” They had enough sleaze mixed with a true understanding of sonic layering and instrumentation. Warren’s subtle vocal style is welcome in any listener’s home, as well as pleasant on ears exposed to the loud and live. Likewise, I enjoyed his project, Compound Eye (I scored an attractive copy of that vinyl which spat forth some great sound explorations, similar in-nature to Fripp and Eno’s ambient LPs (minus Fripp).

I was fortunate to have several interactions with the man, though all were flawed in one way or another. I was asked to DJ records for an Ills show at Union Pool, BK and my needles got busted on the way. I had to resort to a friend’s iPod filled almost solely of Lee Hazelwood (not awful, but redundant.) I drank too much and made an odd display of records I was going to play (some great Iggy and Link Wray bootlegs.) Tres walked up to the booth, gave me a chuckle, a nice try, and a pat on the back. Good guy. He also emailed me instructions on the best way to go about releasing physical music for my own band. Much appreciated.

Our last meeting was at Coyote Club, BK. Tres stood watching me dance like a fool with my partner Lia, whilst he was shrouded in darkness, calm, stoic, hair slightly in his face as per usual. “Hey come move those hips!” — no reply. I stopped. We chatted a bit about our upcoming albums. In no way did I assume this was the last time we’d ever meet in-person. A few weeks later (amidst Covid-19 chaos) I received the unfortunate news, Tres had passed on into infinite Space — a tragedy — too young, too soon. What struck me initially was: this guy is real. The international gang of transcendental electronic songsmiths (already few in numbers) dwindled. “One of us” had left the party, far from being over.

Though this piece may seem brief or relatively cold, so are our waking lives. Be kind to one another. Be thankful for health. Dare to be true. Wherever Tres may have traveled, his music will continue to be spun for a long time. He was honest in his endeavors. His music reflects such. So give another listen. Any of the records, they are all great, you’ll dig em…

A last note. As Burroughs suggested in the 1940’s: It’s possible as we leave our body the brain mutates into a mystical form of electric transference which travels to unknown realms – or we simply perish.

Either way, Tres Warren was a person who aided in mutating our brains in this current state of being. Warren invested his time here to experiment in audio delights, to move listeners into a suspended relaxation; for this, he will be dearly missed.

“Trying to make sense of my life. Going through another change. Going through another change.” TW

 

Alt Citizen Feature

Cerebral corpse walking on brass horns : an interview with Johnny Scuotto

Photos by Felicia Wolfe


As a Star is forming in harsh abyss, collecting particles, sucking blank matter, heating, expelling colors and bizarre life forms – does it conceive metamorphosis? Does it willingly purchase a sharp razor to place above eyebrows and shave them bald? Does it progress through demented spasms as ritual death or visit a Hopi Skeleton House and laugh with those weightless about discarded melon? I’m betting this is Roman, in nature. As silver links dangle from fevered wrists. My question to you, curious reader: When is the last time you danced? If you can’t remember, you should visit the dead more often. I recall my hips shaking, lips curling, and legs twisting, as recently as witnessing, The Johnny Scuotto Band.
     Johnny, as an artist, has been something of an enigma in New York’s music scene for a while now, and I get excited when I learn of a new project he’s involved with (I at least know it won’t be boring.) After a stint playing metal…literally, banging on metal with Art Grey Noise Quintet, he started a few good bands then went into hiatus. Recently, he has re-emerged with a group of players that get down to the essence of what rock music Is. I call it: scum dance-shoe polish-mod bop; call it what you will, it’s great to move to. Johnny’s showmanship is a sight to see. A pleasing combination of thoughtfulness and sleaze, as New York bred.
     I caught up with Scuotto in DUMBO, BK, formally, simply, “The Waterfront”.  Like Johnny, the neighborhood has transformed. Once a dumping ground for bodies and underground clubs, it is now a Hollywood representation of Brooklyn’s future. However, it does have amazing views, timeless factory buildings, and ghosts of quivering time stalking the grounds.
    Pulse machines take notice – cumbersome tunics are no longer sliced to your liking. Hieroglyphs are nothing but English pudding smeared under black leather boots, sharpened to kill tough cerebral corpses. Masking tape will not help you create the labels you desire…
How ya feeling, Johnny?
Johnny Scuotto: I’m okay.
So, these recent songs I’ve had the pleasure of listening to, sound amazing live, and you seem to have captured this energy in the studio. Was your approach to recording focused on the live experience or geared more toward an “at home” listening vibe? I’m assuming ideally both?
JS: Both. You know, live is a completely different animal. Multiple elements come in and out. I think it would be boring if we always replicated what’s on the new recordings. Why keep doing the same thing over and over? It’s more fun experimenting. Hearing happy accidents. That’s what playing live is all about…to me. As far as the recordings go, I’m happy with how they came-out. We got our sound across.
Is this methodology how the band came about? Did you choose musicians based on their improvisational skills? I understand you write all the material, no?
JS: Yes. I write the tunes, then record on GarageBand. The skeleton of the track. Once that happens, I bring it to the band. They learn the parts then elaborate. They’re a big part of the process. They emphasis certain notes, add a few here and there — actually the bass player, Grant Parker, wrote a few of his own parts. He’s incredible. The main songs, however, come from me playing guitar and singing the melody, but yes, the band is great.
What inspired the new songs? I’d insist this seems to be a new musical direction for you. The upcoming album sounds more “straight-forward” than your past output which seemed brutal.
JS: Well, abrasive, yes. It was a different time in my life. I’ve evolved in a different way musically and artistically. I was a lot angrier back then. I still am, sometimes. Depends where and when you catch-me (laughs.) Honestly, I didn’t feel completely myself a few years back. Like living as someone else. I feel sometimes artists have to do that to find there own way. You know, step out of someone else’s shoes and find your own.
You have wonderful shoes.
JS: Thanks.
Coming into your own, how much effect has New York City had on you? It is a place that is always changing. Scenes come and go, neighborhoods change, and as an artist, one can’t help but notice. As someone who has grown-up here, do you feel like a voice for a certain culture that expels from this metropolis?
JS: In a way. I mean, I take influence from what surrounds me, but I don’t walk around all day looking for it. Some of my stage performance comes directly from homeless people having fits. Mental illness is a real issue for me and how it’s dealt with in this city and America. Anyway, I’m not doing anything different. I’m taking from a lot of things I like and hope it turns into something uniquely my own thing. I think it has. I’m just putting my own story onto what others have done in the past. I enjoy, Lou Reed, Suicide, Leonard Cohen, Bowie is a big influence. Look…
I’m consistently observing music scenes as an outside entity. I prefer to not pigeon hole myself to one sound, look or sub-culture, as many of my contemporaries have done. My music is made for everyone. As soon as I’m too comfortable with my work, I make a drastic change.
Do you feel you have a “message” or “persona” you are exposing or pushing in your new material?
JS: I’m not really one for direct “messages.” I mean, I’m not trying to evoke a crazy change in society, but there are definitely things I sing about that one may consider political. I have lyrics about school shootings, based around kids with mental problems, as I stated earlier. This country has a terrible health system. These kids are not being watched properly and are being heavily or not at all medicated. Mental health is just not discussed enough. I put this content in a dance song. I want people to enjoy the tune, dance, but hopefully stop and say, “Hey, what are these lyrics?” I prefer hidden meaning.
You know…the terrorists are here. Running this country. On both sides. The deranged Right and the Bohemian Nazi Left. If anything, I’m singing against non-dialogue. I’m for freedom of speech. I feel we should attempt to find a common ground that helps everyone. I’m no spokes person for what freedom is. I just am doing what I want to do and that’s good enough. Push movement. Coming together. Bring some New York Street to the stage. Dark content. Dance music.

Well said. Final question: Life after death…any thoughts?

JS:

 Amidst phonies, maybes, possibles, nostalgic cripples, caffeine filled baskets of Alphabet City, and comatose victims of malicious Brooklyn – often times truth can be found in curated bins.
Johnny Scuotto, in many ways like Lou and David before him, encompass a city that is as much theirs as they are It’s. His music over the years has progressed or more apropos, morphed, from guitars sounding as drills on skulls to Spector filled dance rock. If you don’t enjoy it, well, it’s not your city, is it? Beware though, soon your jukeboxes filled with memories will warp, and Johnny, will sing: “In the pale wind we fade to white, what doesn’t fly stays inside, from the cradle to the cage, such is life” and come for you sooner than you think.

Alt Citizen Interview

Before we’re born. Before we die: An interview with Jared Artaud of The Vacant Lots

Polaroids by Luz Gallardo

 
“Spin the eddies of the sky inside these black petals. Shadows have covered the earth that bears us. Open a pathway to the ploughing amongst stars. Enlighten us, escort us with your host, Silver legions, on mortal course, Which we strive towards at the core of night.” – A.A.
     Ah, night…at it’s core. A few have dared impose onto her shoulders or kiss her in candle lit rooms of burgundy velvet, colors and wax at their finest, shadows in corners of soundproof warehouses, and I am on my way to the cocktail lounge, Night of Joy, in Brooklyn. Jared Artaud, of The Vacant Lots,  is there. We plan to have a chat (mainly, I will inquire about the duo’s latest EP, ‘Exit’, recorded in Berlin at Cobra Studio by psych-rock guru, Anton Newcombe.) The Vacant Lots have always flirted with the darker aspects of modern music, slicing off a piece of Vega’s meat, yet daring to believe and exist in their own unique sound. Throbbing drum machines, Silvertone amps pushed to their max, and gritty organ blurps, reminiscent of a time in New York City that may never return. Regardless, Jared and Brian display themselves in black and white. The Vacant Lots, don’t adhere to trends, rather they continue to work-out the voices in two heads, with a common goal — provide a listener with sonic truths. Whether this feeling is blissful or strange, it is for you and the night, to decide.
     The club…Jared is DJing. It’s his ‘Damage Control’ residency. The Telescopes, ‘Perfect Needle’ is playing as I walk in. He is clad in a black trench, sat next to a muted lantern in an otherwise dark venue. We greet. Grab a couple of pints, and dig right in…

The Vacant Lots are no longer a “new band” with something to prove to the World-at-Large, about how to tour internationally, release records on important labels, and record material that is as much “raw” as it is “well-produced”; how has time and attention effected the duo since starting out on this journey? Or, how have you departed from “Departure”?

Jared Artaud:  I think the records we make document the evolution of the band. Our sound has changed over the years, but the original vision of the band remains the same. We just continue to make the records we want to make and don’t worry about conforming to trends, just working within the limitations of two people. We consistently strive to push ourselves forward, sonically speaking, and continue to refine what we’re doing, even if our perspectives on life and art change over time.

Agreed. I feel the latest is very well produced, yet the focus of your debut is intact. On a similar note…a 2 part question — How has working with such legends as Anton, Sonic Boom, and Alan Vega affected your work? In the press release for the new EP, you discuss how much of a creative force Anton is in the studio, but I’m curious to know how much influence he had on sounds or arrangements? Also, I know you’re a producer in your own right, but do you find it intimidating when working with artists who have such an honored past and present or business as usual?

Jared:  Working with Anton in the studio for 10 hour days in a row, you learn a lot. There’s no time for overthinking when you’re constantly creating. When songs start to form from the ideas we brought into the studio, you really get a glimpse of what makes Anton such a unique songwriter and producer. I’m grateful cos working with someone like Anton has doubtlessly made me a better artist. I’ve always been inspired by the process of how things are made. So getting to collaborate with other musicians that made me want to make records in the first place is an incredible honor. Anton is extremely self-disciplined and continually innovates while making key decisions on the spot. I like the zone we get into with him in Berlin. He’s created an environment at his studio that I find inspiring and liberating.

I really enjoy the sonic reach of your latest single, ‘Bells’. It seems to have a late-80s UK vibe, meaning a wonderfully layered, yet minimalist feel, but many of these groups (like Echo & the Bunnymen or J&MC) had about five members in them; as a duo do you find it difficult to relay the songs live?

Jared: We never had a problem translating our songs live. The studio and the stage are two separate things. When we make records we aren’t thinking about the live set up. If we want bass, we don’t need a bass player, but one of us has to create it. At times it has been challenging but we’ve always managed to execute the sounds and ideas that we want. It helps that we both play a number of different instruments. We reinterpret our songs for live, we don’t carbon copy. We try to stay true to the song but they are usually reimagined both technically and aesthetically.

Will Vacant Lots forever be a 2-piece or have you ever considered expanding the band?

Jared: Expanding our sound, yes, always. But not the number. It’ll always be two.

The band is headlining at Sunnyvale in Brooklyn on Friday the 25th...is their a difference in approach when being the draw as opposed to opening for bands such as, The Black Rebel Motorcycle Club & The Dandy’s?

Jared: There is usually more pressure from the promoter to sell tickets but since the show is free that isn’t the case. You play a longer set when you headline, so the dynamic and movement of the set is different. You’re not locked into a 30 minute time zone. The focus is less militant and more transportive.

Looking forward to that show, for sure. So what is next on Jared Artaud’s agenda? New LP or possibly another poetry book, and how difficult is it to maintain your focus on these two mediums?

Jared: I just want to make records and tour. Vacant Lots third album will be out next year and we’re in the process of mixing it right now. I finished a third poetry book and want to release that next year as well. I’m also mixing and producing a few other bands right now including working on an Alan Vega music project that I’m terribly psyched about.

I think it’s a balancing act. Making records and writing poetry books are two different mediums. You can infuse rock n roll songs with poetry but it cant suffocate the music. I like having another outlet. There is a totally different style and voice split from a shared vision when it comes to writing poetry than with lyrics. When I’m home I’m usually working on something whether it’s music, poetry or painting.

Well, thank you so much for your time Jared. It’s been a pleasure. One final question, I ask all my interviews: Life after death. Any thoughts?

Jared: What it was like before we were born is what it will be like when we die.

Warmth rushes between soft pink mind, as layers provide. Analog synths and solid guitars are made for a Funeral Party, so “let it rain.” As I step back onto the city streets, I asses: Artaud, is sincere in what he does. He loves music and it’s forever secrets. He lives it. The Vacant Lots have no intention of ending their craft anytime soon. They are friends, musicians, artists. They are not in this game to make popularity blogs (though that is what is happening.) The Vacant Lots, simply want to create music they, themselves, enjoy; who can’t get behind that?

Choosing Anton, to produce/record the latest album, only furthers my prior statement. Personally, I felt a bit lost and hopeless (many years back) with what was being pushed onto airwaves and record shelves, until The Brian Jonestown Massacre began recording again. Anton, consistently inspires and provides listeners with vast musical landscapes of beauty and psychic space. The Vacant Lots understand this. The duo has compiled it into their language. Stare closely at the optical art on ‘Exit’. Two beams. Hear the Bells? Get found. Get lost.